Written by Kate Davis, MD, Pediatrician, Holland Pediatrics   The first few weeks at home with a newborn can be overwhelming and bewildering.  It all looks so easy on television, and everyone has different advice.   All parents feel unsure of themselves at times. There is no such thing as a perfect parent. Many of […]

Written by Kate Davis, MD, Pediatrician, Holland Pediatrics

 

The first few weeks at home with a newborn can be overwhelming and bewildering.  It all looks so easy on television, and everyone has different advice.   All parents feel unsure of themselves at times. There is no such thing as a perfect parent. Many of your worries will disappear as you begin to care for your baby. Here is some information that should help you those first few weeks after bringing your baby home. 

Feeding

Feeding is the time when parents communicate closely with their new infant. Whether breast or bottle feeding, this is the time to hold your baby close to you in order to help both you and the baby form a strong bond. 

Breastmilk is the ideal food for your newborn infant. It offers the perfect balance of nutrients as well as some protection against illness. However, don’t feel guilty if you prefer to or must bottle feed your baby. Millions of children have grown up healthy and strong with formula. Discuss feeding concerns with your baby’s doctor before making any formula changes. 

Infants typically want to feed every 1-3 hours. It is best to feed on demand for at least the first month of age, but if your baby hasn’t woken after 3 hours to eat in the first 2-3 weeks you should wake them in order to offer the breast or bottle.  Typically infants take 2-3 ounces at a time for the first few weeks of life and then gradually increase the amount. It is important to see your baby’s doctor within a few days after going home from the hospital to make sure they are gaining weight properly.

Most babies will spit up at times, some more frequently than others. This is normal.   Burping your infant frequently may help to reduce this occurrence but will not eliminate it altogether.  If they are spitting up large amounts each feeding it can sometimes mean they are getting too much to eat.  Seeing your baby’s doctor for a weight check can help determine if there is any concern with the amount of spitting up.

Signs that baby is getting enough milk are as follows:

  • Steady weight gain after the first week of age
  • Pale yellow urine, not deep yellow or orange
  • Sleeping well, yet baby looks alert and healthy when awake

Babies do not need anything besides breastmilk or formula until at least 4 months of age, and should never be given plain water under 4 months of age

Diapers

You should expect to change a lot of diapers with your newborn.  You should expect:

  • First day home: 2-3 bowel movements and wet diapers
  • Day 3: Should have at least 3 of each/day
  • Day 4: Should have at least 4 of each/day
  • Day 5: Should have at least 5 of each/day
  • After the first few weeks, babies should continue to have a wet diaper with each change but bowel movements can become less frequent. Formula-fed infants may have fewer bowel movements than breastfed but should still have plenty of wet diapers. 
  • Bowel movement will change from a sticky, tarry type to a yellowish color during the first week of life.

Sleep Patterns

Your baby should sleep on his or her back only. Babies spend most of their time sleeping and will awaken every 2 to 4 hours to eat. Often they seem to have their nights and days mixed up and want to sleep during the day and be up more frequently at night. They will gradually begin to sleep less during the daytime and longer at night, but it is not much you can do to make this happen. If your baby sleeps longer than 3-4 hours you can wake them to feed during the first 2 weeks.  Some infants will sleep longer stretches during the night quite quickly and some won’t do it until closer to 4 months of age. If they are being held constantly during the day they may be more resistant to laying in their crib or bassinet at night, so have your baby spend some time in the bassinet or crib during the day as well. 

Skin 

The majority of diaper rashes are due to skin contact with urine or stool, careful attention to the following should help:

  • Change the diaper frequently and cleanse the area well
  • Use plain water to cleanse if able (rinse wipes out or use a clean washcloth)
  • Expose the skin to air for 5 minutes three times a day
  • Soak bottom in a warm bath for 15 minutes twice a day
  • Zinc oxide, Vitamin A & D and other diaper creams may be used

Newborns tend to have very dry skin during the first two weeks of life due to the fact that they were hanging out in fluid for 9 months.  You can use a small amount of lotion on their skin but don’t feel like you have to. Use unscented products as much as possible. 

Hiccups

Newborns get hiccups all the time.  It is not because you are feeding them wrong.    They often happen after eating due to the fact that their stomach fills and then can rub up against their diaphragm, causing hiccups. They will go away on their own and usually are not bothersome to your baby.

Sneezing

Infants also sneeze a lot. It does not mean that they are allergic or getting sick. It is their way of trying to clear their nasal passages.  

Illness

Infants are more susceptible to getting sick and should be seen immediately if they develop a fever >100.4 during the first 10 weeks of life.  Encourage good handwashing at home and ask friends and family members to stay away if they are not feeling well.  

Doctor’s visits

You will probably get to know your baby’s doctor pretty well in the first few months of life.  You should expect to see them a few days after going home from the hospital and then usually at 3 weeks of age again. Often you will be seen in between those visits to check weight or bilirubin (jaundice) levels.  You should also expect check-ups at 2, 4, and 6 months in that first 6 months of life.  

Vaccines

Vaccines (immunizations, shots) are important to keep your infant healthy.  Discuss any questions or concerns you have with your newborn’s doctor.  

Try to enjoy the time with your infant.  Allow others to help if you are feeling overwhelmed or exhausted.  If you feel like you are not able to enjoy any time with your infant or family you may have postpartum depression and anxiety and you should reach out to your own doctor or your newborn’s doctor to get help dealing with that very common condition. 

For more great resources the American Academy of Pediatrics has a parent website called HealthyChidren.org.  There is a section on the first months of life with lots of information at https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/Pages/default.aspx, and it is available in Spanish as well.

Congratulations!

Escrito por Kate Davis, MD, Pediatra, Holland Pediatrics Las primeras semanas en casa con un recién nacido pueden ser abrumadoras y desconcertantes. Todo parece tan fácil en la televisión, y todos tienen diferentes consejos. Todos los padres se sienten inseguros de sí mismos a veces. No existe un padre perfecto. Muchas de sus preocupaciones desaparecerán […]

Escrito por Kate Davis, MD, Pediatra, Holland Pediatrics

Las primeras semanas en casa con un recién nacido pueden ser abrumadoras y desconcertantes. Todo parece tan fácil en la televisión, y todos tienen diferentes consejos. Todos los padres se sienten inseguros de sí mismos a veces. No existe un padre perfecto. Muchas de sus preocupaciones desaparecerán cuando comience a cuidar a su bebé. Aquí hay información que debería ayudarlo esas primeras semanas después de traer a su bebé a casa.

Alimentación

La alimentación es el momento en que los padres se comunican estrechamente con su nuevo bebé. Ya sea amamantando o alimentando con biberón, este es el momento de sostener a su bebé cerca de usted para ayudarlo a usted y al bebé a formar un vínculo fuerte.

La leche materna es el alimento ideal para su recién nacido. Ofrece el equilibrio perfecto de nutrientes, así como cierta protección contra enfermedades. Sin embargo, no se sienta culpable si prefiere o debe alimentar con biberón a su bebé. Millones de niños han crecido sanos y fuertes con fórmula. Discuta los problemas de alimentación con el médico de su bebé antes de realizar cambios en la fórmula.

Los bebés generalmente quieren alimentarse cada 1-3 horas. Es mejor alimentarse a demanda durante al menos el primer mes de edad, pero si su bebé no se ha despertado después de 3 horas para comer en las primeras 2-3 semanas, debe despertarlo para ofrecerle el pecho o el biberón. Por lo general, los bebés toman 2-3 onzas a la vez durante las primeras semanas de vida y luego aumentan gradualmente la cantidad. Es importante ver al médico de su bebé dentro de unos días después de irse a casa desde el hospital para asegurarse de que esté aumentando de peso correctamente.

La mayoría de los bebés vomitan a veces, algunos con más frecuencia que otros. Esto es normal. Eructar a su bebé con frecuencia puede ayudar a reducir esta ocurrencia, pero no lo eliminará por completo. Si escupen grandes cantidades cada vez que se alimentan, a veces puede significar que están comiendo demasiado. Visitar al médico de su bebé para un control de peso puede ayudar a determinar si existe alguna preocupación con la cantidad de escupir.

Las señales de que el bebé está recibiendo suficiente leche son las siguientes:

Aumento constante de peso después de la primera semana de edad.
Orina de color amarillo pálido, no de color amarillo oscuro o naranja
Duerme bien, pero el bebé se ve alerta y saludable cuando está despierto

Los bebés no necesitan nada más que leche materna o fórmula hasta que tengan al menos 4 meses de edad, y nunca se les debe dar agua sola antes de los 4 meses de edad.

Pañales

Debe esperar cambiar muchos pañales con su recién nacido. Debes esperar:

Primer día en casa: 2-3 deposiciones y pañales mojados
Día 3: debe tener al menos 3 de cada día
Día 4: debe tener al menos 4 de cada día
Día 5: debe tener al menos 5 de cada día

Después de las primeras semanas, los bebés deben seguir teniendo un pañal mojado con cada cambio, pero las deposiciones pueden volverse menos frecuentes. Los bebés alimentados con fórmula pueden tener menos evacuaciones intestinales que amamantados, pero aún deben tener muchos pañales mojados.
El movimiento intestinal cambiará de un tipo pegajoso y alquitranado a un color amarillento durante la primera semana de vida.

Patrones de sueño

Su bebé solo debe dormir boca arriba. Los bebés pasan la mayor parte del tiempo durmiendo y se despiertan cada 2 a 4 horas para comer. A menudo parecen tener sus noches y días confusos y quieren dormir durante el día y levantarse con más frecuencia por la noche. Poco a poco comenzarán a dormir menos durante el día y durante más tiempo por la noche, pero no es mucho lo que puede hacer para que esto suceda. Si su bebé duerme más de 3-4 horas, puede despertarlo para alimentarlo durante las primeras 2 semanas. Algunos bebés dormirán durante períodos más largos durante la noche con bastante rapidez y otros no lo harán hasta cerca de los 4 meses de edad. Si se mantienen constantemente durante el día, pueden ser más resistentes a acostarse en la cuna o el moisés por la noche, así que haga que su bebé también pase un rato en el moisés o la cuna durante el día.

Piel

La mayoría de las erupciones del pañal se deben al contacto de la piel con la orina o las heces, lo que debería ayudar a lo siguiente:

Cambie el pañal con frecuencia y limpie bien el área
Use agua corriente para limpiar si es posible (enjuague las toallitas o use una toallita limpia)
Exponer la piel al aire durante 5 minutos tres veces al día.
Remoje el fondo en un baño tibio durante 15 minutos dos veces al día
Se pueden usar óxido de zinc, vitamina A y D y otras cremas para pañales

Los recién nacidos tienden a tener la piel muy seca durante las primeras dos semanas de vida debido al hecho de que estuvieron con líquidos durante 9 meses. Puedes usar una pequeña cantidad de loción en su piel, pero no sientas que tienes que hacerlo. Use productos sin perfume tanto como sea posible.

Hipo

Los recién nacidos tienen hipo todo el tiempo. No es porque los estás alimentando mal. A menudo ocurren después de comer debido al hecho de que su estómago se llena y luego puede frotar contra su diafragma, causando hipo. Se irán solos y, por lo general, no son molestos para su bebé.

Estornudos

Los bebés también estornudan mucho. No significa que sean alérgicos o se enfermen. Es su forma de tratar de limpiar sus fosas nasales.

Enfermedad

Los bebés son más susceptibles a enfermarse y deben ser vistos de inmediato si desarrollan fiebre> 100.4 durante las primeras 10 semanas de vida. Fomente el buen lavado de manos en casa y pida a amigos y familiares que se mantengan alejados si no se sienten bien.

Doctor’s visits

You will probably get to know your baby’s doctor pretty well in the first few months of life.  You should expect to see them a few days after going home from the hospital and then usually at 3 weeks of age again. Often you will be seen in between those visits to check weight or bilirubin (jaundice) levels.  You should also expect check-ups at 2, 4, and 6 months in that first 6 months of life.  

Vacunas

Las vacunas (vacunas, vacunas) son importantes para mantener sano a su bebé. Discuta cualquier pregunta o inquietud que tenga con el médico de su recién nacido.

Trate de disfrutar el tiempo con su bebé. Permita que otros lo ayuden si se siente abrumado o agotado. Si siente que no puede disfrutar de ningún momento con su bebé o su familia, puede tener depresión y ansiedad posparto y debe comunicarse con su propio médico o con el médico de su recién nacido para obtener ayuda para lidiar con esa condición tan común.

Para obtener más recursos excelentes, la Academia Estadounidense de Pediatría tiene un sitio web para padres llamado HealthyChidren.org. Hay una sección sobre los primeros meses de vida con mucha información en https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/Pages/default.aspx, y también está disponible en español.

¡Felicidades!

en_USEN